Photographer, represented by the Liebowitz firm, sued defendant media website for unauthorized publication of plaintiff’s photo illustrating an article entitled “Rick Ross Questions Birdman’s Net Worth After Cash Money Boss Defaults On $12 Million Loan.” Plaintiff’s allegation that defendant was based in Brooklyn according to third-party website, deemed inadmissible hearsay and therefore insufficient to establish

Strike 3 subpoenas ISPs to determine the identities of John Does that it alleges downloaded its copyrighted (adult) films. The decision describes the procedure to be filed in view of the “sensitive nature of the allegations.”

strike 2 john doe subpoena edny

From the decision: Across a diverse array of commercial and industrial endeavors, from paving roads to building the Internet of Things, private organizations have developed written standards to resolve technical problems, ensure compatibility across products, and promote public safety. These technical works, which authoring organizations copyright upon publication, are typically distributed as voluntary guidelines for

My colleagues Mel Garner, Rob Isackson, Lauren Emerson and I co-authored an amicus brief on behalf of the New York IP Law Association, filed in a Federal Circuit appea, Syngenta v Willowood. We argued that FIFRA, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, does not preclude application of the Copyright Act, and thus a copyright

Footnote two is a contender for funniest Supreme Court footnote this term.

Justia’s Summary:

Kirtsaeng bought low-cost foreign edition textbooks in Thailand and resold them to students in the U.S. In 2013 the Supreme Court held that Kirtsaeng could invoke the Copyright Act’s “first-sale doctrine,” 17 U.S.C. 109(a), as a defense to the publisher’s

From the complaint: Plaintiff Swatch, a Swiss publicly traded company, hosted a conference call for securities analysts. The call was transmitted and recorded by a conference call service. Participants were instructed not to record the call for publication or broadcast. Bloomberg News was not invited or authorized to participate in the call. Bloomberg recorded the

NY Times Freakonomics Blog: Copyright and Football:

The theory behind copyright is simple – if we allow anyone to copy a good new idea, then no one will come up with the next one.  The theory makes perfect sense – in theory.  In previous posts, however, we have described how fashion designers, chefs, comedians